The Golden House by: T. Greenwood

The Golden Hour by T. Greenwood
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Between childhood and adulthood. Between truth and lies. This is the thing about a lie; over time, it not only obscures the truth but consumes it. Those who pursue veracity (those do-gooders seekers) see truth not as an abstract thing but something concrete. Strong, vivid, with an unassailable right to prevail. But those who fight for it, who fight in the name of it, do not understand that truth is anemic, weak. Especially in the hands of an accomplished liar. Especially over years. A lie, in collusion with time, can overpower the truth. A good lie has the power to subsume reality. A good lie can become the truth. The Golden Hour is that magical hour that comes before dusk…where all things come to light.

I have to admit I was somewhat frustrated with this read until I got it. I think that is the genius of it. Greenwood is an accomplished writer. She has a way with words that she can take something ordinary and with words make it extraordinary.

Wynn Davis is running from the truth of what happened to her 13 year old self. She is now married, separated from her husband, both living in the same duplex sharing their daughter Avery. The pain of long ago comes crashing back into her life when a boy from her past now a man is up for a new trial. Thru most of her running (maybe therein lies my frustration, I was getting worn out) from her marriage and past, she ends up in Maine, in a house that has been abandoned for years and finds photographs that tell of a haunted woman and her secrets.

Without giving to much away, it is finding the truth about the mysterious woman that she finds the courage to face the truth that she has been running from. It is only then she can face her truth without fear.

A Special Thank You to Kensington and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

View all my reviews

Advertisements Share this:
Like this:Like Loading... Related
 
kutyabajok mozicsilag | Knowing Brother Episode 76 | Batman: The Brave and the Bold